The Final Fantasy Legend

Pocket Games
8th Best Game Boy Game
The Final Fantasy Legend is Square’s first game to sell over a million copies, with the Game Boy version alone having shipped 1.37 million copies worldwide as of March 31, 2003, 1.15 million of which were shipped in Japan. The game was quickly followed by two sequels for the Game Boy, with later games under the SaGa franchise released on other video game consoles.
The one-eyed monster featured on the Japanese box art later appeared in the sequel as a character named “Teacher”, and became the series’ mascot. Outside of Square, Game Freak founder Satoshi Tajiri cited the game as an influence behind the Pokmon series on the Game Boy, stating it gave him the idea that the system could handle more than action games.

Since its release the game has received mixed reception, with an aggregate review score of 50.63% on GameRankings. IGN called Final Fantasy Legend a “compelling RPG with a complex gameplay system and a solid soundtrack”, though complained about the game’s difficulty and described its graphics as appearing “dated”.
German gaming magazine Power Play gave the game a score of 78%, but praised it for showing potential for the Game Boy and its role as the first role-playing game on the title. Allgame praised the title on its merits as a role-playing game, but complained about its high difficulty and a lack of a sense of direction. 1UP.com’s Retronauts described its gameplay as a successor to Final Fantasy II’s, noting that the randomness of the mutant and monster character classes made the game very difficult, and was not properly refined until the game’s sequel.

Other sources and publications have reacted to the game more favorably. Author Jeff Rovin praised the title heavily in the book How to Win at Game Boy Games, noting the manual as thorough and adding while not as complex as The Legend of Zelda, the game was a “masterful achievement for the Game Boy unit, and a superlative game of [its] kind”.
In May 1991, Nintendo Power named the game the third all-around best Game Boy game of the previous year, and in September 1997 they ranked it 70th on their list of the “Top 100” games to appear on a Nintendo system, stating that it had “stayed true to the Square Soft tradition”.

1UP.com’s Jeremy Parish called it one of the “essential” games for the Game Boy as well as one of the best of 1989, citing its introduction of new ideas that contrasted against the Final Fantasy series and calling it “a pretty decent portable RPG in its own right”.

GameDaily named it alongside the related Game Boy Final Fantasy titles as definitive games for the system, describing it as providing “hours of role-playing excitement, whether you were waiting in a dentist’s office or on the way to Grandma’s house.” The sentiment is also shared by others such as Electronic Gaming Monthly, Pocket Games, and GameSpot, the latter two naming it one of the top fifty games for the Game Boy.

The difficulty and significance of the game’s final boss, the Creator, has been mentioned by several sources. GamePro named him one of the “47 Most Diabolical Video-Game Villains of All Time”, placing him 37th on the list and adding “You gotta wonder… how many hit points did the developers give God?” 1UP.com described the battle briefly as “epic”, noting it as part of a recurring theme of Japanese role-playing games featuring characters banding together to kill God.

Comedian Jackie Kashian referenced the Creator on Comedy Central Presents, describing the game’s final battle as “the worst premise ever of any video game”, though stated that regardless she continued trying for eight months to defeat the boss.
In February 1990, Futabasha Publishers Ltd. released a book titled Makai Toushi Saaoukenshatachi no Rekuiemu (?, Requiem of their Adventures). Written by Misa Ikeda, the 287-page book was part of Futabasha’s Game Boy Adventure series for children, and detailed a hero’s trek to the top of the tower to reach Paradise.

In October 1992, the game was one of four titles featured by Game Player’s magazine on a video tape named Game Player’s Gametape for Game Boy Games, which demonstrated the game and offered a tutorial for playing it.
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^ Square Co. The Final Fantasy Legend. (Square Co). Game Boy. Level/area: before Ashura. (1990-09-30) “Bookshelves: Ashura… is… controlled… by… the… / PartyMember1: We cannot read this final word. / PartyMember2: Who controls Ashura…?”
^ Square Co. The Final Fantasy Legend. (Square Co). Game Boy. Level/area: vs. Ashura. (1990-09-30) “Ashura: So, you’ve made it this far. I’ll make a deal with you. PartyMember1: A deal? / Ashura: I’ll give each of you a piece of the world. How does that sound? / PartyMember1: No way! We’ll never work for you. / Ashura: I was just being nice, but now you’ve pushed your luck.”

^ Square Co. The Final Fantasy Legend. (Square Co). Game Boy. Level/area: vs. the Creator. (1990-09-30) “Creator: Congratulations! I’ve been waiting for you. You are the first to finish the game. / PartyMember1: Game? / Creator: Yes, it’s a game I created. / PartyMember2: What do you mean? / Creator: People did not know what courage and determination meant. So, I created Ashura to see what people would do. / PartyMember4: You are crazy! / Creator: Ashura tested all of you. / PartyMember3: So, it was a game? / Creator: That’s right. I wanted to see a hero defeat this evil. / PartyMember1: We were all piece of your design! / Creator: You understand well. Many have failed the test, but it was refreshing to courage in the face of danger. I want to reward you for your accomplishment. I will grant you a wish. / PartyMember2: We didn’t do it for a reward. Besides, you used us! / Creator: What’s wrong with that? I created everything. / PartyMember1: We are not things! / Creator: How amusing…You are trying to pick a fight with me! Are you sure? It’s the destiny of mortals…Very well. Remember the greatness of my power!”

^ Square Co. The Final Fantasy Legend. (Square Co). Game Boy. Level/area: Epilogue. (1990-09-30) “PartyMember4 It’s done. / PartyMember1 … … / PartyMember2 What are we to do now? / PartyMember1 … … / PartyMember3 Is there another world beyond? / PartyMember1 Shall we go there? / PartyMember2 It doesn’t matter to me. / PartyMember4 Well, we didn’t do too badly. / PartyMember3 That’s right. We defeated all of the evil. / PartyMember1 Let’s go! Others Where? / PartyMember1: To our world!”

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External links
Official Game Boy version info page (Japanese)
Official WonderSwan Color version website (Japanese)
Official mobile phone version website (Japanese)
v d e
SaGa series
Final Fantasy Legend
The Final Fantasy Legend Final Fantasy Legend II (SaGa 2) Final Fantasy Legend III
Romancing SaGa
Romancing SaGa Romancing SaGa 2 Romancing SaGa 3
Other titles
SaGa Frontier SaGa Frontier 2 Unlimited Saga

See also
Music
v d e
Final Fantasy series
Main games
Final Fantasy II III IV V VI VII VIII IX X XI XII XIII XIV XV
Sequels
Final Fantasy IV: The After Years Final Fantasy X-2 Final Fantasy XII: Revenant Wings
Related series
Chocobo Crystal Defenders Compilation of Final Fantasy VII Fabula Nova Crystallis Final Fantasy XIII Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles Ivalice Kingdom Hearts Mana SaGa and Final Fantasy Legend

Related games
Final Fantasy Tactics Dissidia Ehrgeiz Final Fantasy Adventure Final Fantasy Mystic Quest Hikari no 4 Senshi: Final Fantasy Gaiden Fortress
Films and animation
Final Fantasy: Legend of the Crystals Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within (Aki Ross) Final Fantasy: Unlimited Final Fantasy VII Advent Children Last Order: Final Fantasy VII
List of Final Fantasy media Character design Gameplay Minigames Music

Categories: 1989 video games | Final Fantasy games | Game Boy games | Mobile phone games | SaGa | WonderSwan Color games

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